Measurements
Glossary of Arabic Cuisine
Dictionary of Arabic Cuisine

Measurements

Weights Lengths Volume Oven Temperature

oz

g

  inch

mm

  fl oz

ml

  mark ° F ° C
½

10

  1/8

3

  2

55

  1

275

140

¾

20

  ¼

5

  3

75

  2

300

150

1

25

  inch

cm

  5

150

  3

325

170

1 ½

40

  ½

1.0

  10

275

  4

350

180

2

50

  ¾

2.0

  15

425

  5

375

190

2 ½

60

  1

2.5

  pt

ml

  6

400

200

3

75

  1 ¼

3.0

  ¼

150

  7

425

220

4

110

  1 ½

4.0

  ½

275

  8

450

230

4 ½

125

  1 ¾

4.5

  ¾

425

  9

475

240

5

150

  2

5.0

  1

570

       
6

175

  2 ½

6.0

  1 ¼

725

  Notes    
7

200

  3

7.5

  pt

litre

       
8

225

  3 ½

9.0

  1 ¾

1.0

       
9

250

  4

10

  2

1.2

       
10

275

  5

13

  2 ½

1.5

       
12

350

  6

15

  4

2.25

       
lb.

g

  7

18

             
1

450

  8

20

  Notes          
1 ½

700

  9

23

             
2

900

  10

25

             
3

1300

  12

30

             

Note:

1 English cup = 1.1/4 American cup
1 American cup = 3/4 English cup

 

Glossary of Arabic Cuisine

Arabic cuisine has its roots in tent cookery. Nomadic tribes could use only transportable foods such as rice and dates, or ambulatory stock like sheep and camels in their recipes - which tended to be rough sketches rather than strict formulae.

As the caravans journeyed throughout the Middle East, new seasonings and vegetables were discovered and added to the existing repertoire. Each new discovery was incorporated into the diet in quantities palatable to a particular tribe - a fact that many cooks believe is responsible for the anomalies found in some Arabic dishes today.

The nomadic Bedouin influence is broadened by other cuisines from the Arab world, notably from Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Egypt, resulting in a highly diverse food and drink culture.

Lebanese contributions have been the greatest influence on modern Middle Eastern cuisine, in no small part due to the entrepreneurship of the Lebanese that has helped to spread Arabic cuisine throughout the world from its centre in the Levant in such areas as Aleppo, Damascus, Beirut and Nablus. Lebanese culinary influence and business skills provide the framework for the exotic cuisine recognised internationally as Arabic.

Hospitality in the Arab world is second to none, and nowhere is it better expressed than in the age-old custom of serving freshly-brewed coffee or mint tea to every guest, whether the gathering be business or social.

The foreigner who takes time to learn and experiment with this excellent cuisine will be immediately won over and rewarded with many wonderful surprises. Arabic food can rival any international gastronomy for originality and good taste, and, because it basically comprises simple, natural and easily digested foodstuffs, it ranks high in nutritional value with today's fitness-conscious society.


Dictionary of Arabic Cuisine

Arabic Bread (Khubz Arabi, pitta bread)

Flat, round bread, which can be easily split to make a sandwich, or broken apart and used as a utensil for scooping food
Arayess
Deep-fried lamb sandwich
Ataif (gatayef, kataif)
Small pancakes stuffed with nuts or cheese and doused with syrup
Baba Ghanouge
Char-grilled eggplant, tahina, olive oil, lemon juice and garlic purée - served as a dip
Baharat
Arabic mixed spices
Bamia
Baby okra and lamb in tomato stew
Baklawa (baklava)
Dessert of layered pastry filled with nuts and steeped in honey-lemon syrup - usually cut into triangular or diamond shapes
Basboosa
Semolina tart soaked with syrup
Bukhari Rice
Lamb and rice stir-fried with onion, lemon, carrot and tomato paste
Burghul
Partboiled and dried wheat kernels processed into grain, used in tabbouleh and mixed with lamb in kibbeh
Cardamom
Aromatic spice, member of the ginger family, used to flavour Arabic coffee, yoghurt and stews
Coriander
Lacy, green-leaf relative of the parsley family with an extremely pungent flavour akin to a combination of lemon, sage and caraway.
Falafel
Small deep-fried patties made of highly-spiced ground chick-peas
Fatayer
Pastry pockets filled with spinach, meat or cheese
Fattoush
Salad of toasted croutons, cucumbers, tomatoes and mint
Foul (ful)
Slow-cooked mash of brown beans and red lentils, dressed with lemon, olive oil and cumin
Gahwa (kahwa)
Coffee
Haleeb
Milk
Halwa (halawa)
Sesame paste sweet, usually made in a slab and studded with fruit and nuts
Hamour
Red Sea fish of the grouper family
Hommus (Humus)
Purée of chickpeas, tahina, lemon and garlic - served as a dip with Arabic bread
Jarish
Crushed wheat and yoghurt casserole
Jebne (Jibin)
White cheese
Kabsa
Classic Arabian dish of meat mixed with rice
Kebab
Skewered chunks of meat or fish cooked over charcoal
Kamareddine
Apricot nectar used to break fast during Ramadan
Khubz Marcook
Thin, dome-shaped Arabic bread
Kunafi (knaffee / kunafah)
Shoelace pastry dessert stuffed with sweet white cheese, nuts and syrup
Kibbeh (kibbe)
Oval-shaped nuggets of ground lamb and burghul
Kibbeh Naye
Raw kibbeh, eaten like steak tartar
Koshary
Cooked dish of pasta, rice and lentils to which, onions, chillis and tomato paste are added
Kouzi
Whole lamb baked over rice so that rice absorbs the juice of the meat
Kufta (kofta)
Fingers, balls or a flat cake of minced meat and spices that can be baked or charcoal-grilled on skewers
Laban
Tangy-tasting sour milk drink widely used in cooking as a substitute for milk
Labenah
Thick creamy cheese, often spiced and used as a dip
Lahme Bil Ajeen
Arabic pizza
Loubia (fasoulia)
Green beans cooked in tomato sauce
Ma'amul
Date cookies shaped in a wooden mould called a tabi
Makloubeh
Meat or fish with rice, broad beans and cauliflower
Mai
Water
Mantou
Dumplings stuffed with minced lamb
Markok
Lamb and pumpkin stew
Mehshi
Means stuffed - aubergines, courgettes, vine leaves or cabbage may be stuffed with a mixture of minced meat, rice and onions
Meloukhieh
Green, spinach-like vegetable
Mezze (mezza, meze, mezzah)
The Arabic word for appetiser.
Mish mish
Apricots
Mouhammara
Mixture of ground nuts, olive oil, cumin and chillis, eaten with Arabic bread 
Moutabel (Mtabel)
Eggplant dip made with tahina, olive oil and lemon juice
Mubassal
Onion pancakes
Muhalabiyyah
Silky textured semolina pudding served cold
Musakhan
Chicken casserole with sumac
Mutabak
Sweet or savoury pastry turnovers usually stuffed with cheese, banana or meat
Najil
Saddle-back grouper
Rocca
Aromatic salad green with a peppery mustard flavour, used in salads or mixed with hot yoghurt
Sambusek
Triangular pies filled with meat, cheese or spinach
Sayyadiya
Delicately-spiced fish dish served on a bed of rice
Seleek
Lamb and rice dish where the rice is cooked in milk rather than the juice of the meat
Shai (chai)
Tea
Shaour
Red Sea fish from the emperor family
Shawerma
A cone of pressed lamb, chicken or beef roasted on a vertical spit where the meat is shaved off from the outside as the spit keeps turning. Saudi Arabia's most popular sandwich is Arabic bread filled with shawerma meat, salad, hot sauce and tahina
Sheesha (hubbly bubbly)
Pipe for smoking tobacco leaves or dried fruit through a water filter
Shish Taouk
Skewered chicken pieces cooked over charcoal
Shourba
Soup
Snober
Pine nuts
Sukkar
Sugar
Sumac
Ground powder from the cashew family, used as a seasoning
Tabbouleh
Salad of burghul, tomato, mint and parsley
Taklia
Spice consisting of ground coriander and garlic
Tahina
An oily paste made from ground sesame seeds, used in hommus, moutabel and baba ghanoush
Tamr
Dates
Taratour
A thick mayonnaise of puréed pine nuts, garlic and lemon, used as a sauce or dip
Um Ali
'Ali's mother' is a pastry pudding with raisins and coconut steeped in milk
Warak Enab (warak dawali)
Stuffed vine leaves
Yansoon
Hot spiced tea, used for medicinal purposes
Zaytoon
Olives
Zattar
Blend of spices including thyme, marjoram, sumac and salt

 

   

Chapter (1)

Chapter (2)

Chapter (3)

Chapter (4)

Chapter (5)

Chapter (6)

Introduction

Measurements

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